Lions’ Rookie Wide Receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown is Part of the Most Interesting Family in Football

The Detroit Lions had a phenomenal draft, which feels weird to say. Part of what made their draft class so strong was the inexplicable slide of wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown to the fourth round. Detroit got a steal in drafting this University of Southern California product.

From a football standpoint, St. Brown has the potential to make a huge impact on the field. What many Lions fans might not be aware of, however, is the complex and fascinating family that he was raised in. The St. Brown family is the most interesting family in all of football. 

Amon-Ra and his two brothers are all receivers

The older of the St. Brown brothers is already in the NFC North. Equanimeous St. Brown is a third-year wide receiver with the Green Bay Packers, and while he’s shown flashes, hasn’t amounted to much. During his rookie season in 2018, Equanimeous had 21 receptions for 328 yards. He missed 2019 due to an ankle injury, and then was listed as a starter for only one game in 2020. 

Equanimeous had a prolific sophomore season at Notre Dame, racking up 961 receiving yards and nine touchdowns, using his 6-foot-5 frame to his advantage. After cooling off in his junior season to the tune of 515 receiving yards, he lasted until the sixth round of the 2018 NFL Draft.

Amon-Ra will look to take the steps that his older brother hasn’t yet been able to. The smaller and the youngest of the St. Brown brothers, Amon-Ra is 5-foot-11, but operates as a physical receiver with strong hands and jump ball abilities. He had a similar sophomore season to his older brother, logging 1,042 receiving yards and six touchdowns. In the COVID-19-shortened 2020 season, he posted 478 receiving yards, but a career high seven touchdowns in only six games.

Next in line for the St. Brown family is Osiris, who is entering his senior year at Stanford after an essentially non-existent junior year while Stanford played in only one game. With a full season ahead of him, he will look to build a resume that will see him join his brothers in the NFL.

His father, John Brown, is a two-time Mr. Universe winner

The father of the three boys, John Brown, was the driving force behind the family’s success on the football field, while their mother, Miriam, drove their success in academics. Miriam kept the three brothers sharp, John taught his boys at a young age how to train their bodies, putting them on strict nutrition and fitness programs while turning the three of them into star high school athletes before they made their way to the next level.

His larger than life personality and the intense manner in which he went about pushing for his sons’ athletic success led to him being known as “the LaVar Ball of College Football.” 

“People always ask, ‘Who the best is out of all of them?’ I go, ‘It depends on the situation,’” John told Sports Illustrated. “Equanimeous is like good soul music. Osiris is like good jazz, smooth jazz. Amon-Ra is good rap.”   

Amon-Ra is St. Brown making noise in training camp

It hasn’t taken long for Amon-Ra to make a name for himself in his new NFL club. The rookie is bringing the competitive fire that he was known for in college with him to the pros, making plays and challenging the best players in front of him, including last year’s third overall pick, cornerback Jeff Okudah. 

“Went against Jeff [Okudah], and then he had a pretty good play on me on the slant. So I told him I wanted to go against him again, so then I kind of cut the line and went again,” Amon-Ra said, according to Pride of Detroit. “Then I caught a ball, and he wanted me to go against him, so he called me out and I cut the line again and I went again.”

He caught all three balls when lined up against Okudah. 

Of the three brothers, Amon-Ra is most like his father, possessing a fire and a competitive edge that drives him towards success. He is already running with the first-string offense in training camp, and will have all the opportunity in the world to make a name for himself in Detroit. 

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