Golf

The PGA Championship Wreaked Havoc on the Official World Golf Ranking

Collin Morikawa rocked the golf world with an amazing win at the PGA Championship on Sunday, outlasting some of golf’s top names to win his first major championship. At one point during Sunday’s final round, seven players were tied atop the leaderboard at TPC Harding Park before Morikawa broke away from the pack. An unlikely chip-in birdie at the 14th gave him a one-shot lead and an incredible eagle at the 16th sealed the deal as he became just the fourth player in the stroke-play era of the PGA to win at age 23, joining Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, and Rory McIlroy. With his win, Collin Morikawa officially moved into the top five of the Official World Golf Ranking for the first time, which certainly saw a lot of movement following the season’s first major championship.

Collin Morikawa moved into the top 5 of the Official World Golf Ranking, which features a new No. 1

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With his win at the PGA Championship, Collin Morikawa moved from No. 12 in the newest Official World Golf Ranking, which was released on Monday, to No. 5. Following his professional debut at the RBC Canadian Open last June, Morikawa was ranked 1,039th and is now in the top five. That’s what three wins and a major championship will do for you.

There is also a new world No. 1. Well, it’s the No. 1 that was there just a couple of weeks ago but has now returned to the spot, Jon Rahm. Rahm finished tied for 13th at the PGA Championship and took back the No. 1 ranking from Justin Thomas, who won in Memphis last week but had to settle for a tie for 37th at Harding Park and is now at No. 2.

Rory McIlroy was the only man in the top five to stay put this week, holding steady at No. 3. Following a disappointing runner-up finish after coming into the final round of the PGA Championship with the lead, Dustin Johnson moved up one spot to No. 4.

Webb Simpson dropped out of the top five, falling two spots to No. 6, and Brooks Koepka continued his slide down at No. 7 after holding the top spot earlier this year. In an odd turn of events, Bryson DeChambeau, despite finishing tied for fourth, dropped from No. 7 to No. 8. Patrick Reed dropped from eighth to ninth and Adam Scott, who played quite well in his first tournament back since the restart of golf, dropped from ninth to 10th.

Tiger Woods dropped out of the top 15 for the first time in nearly two years

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Tiger Woods is out of the top 15 in the Official World Golf Ranking for the first time in nearly two years after finishing tied for 37th. Woods climbed back into the top 15 with his win at the 2018 Tour Championship and got as high as No. 5 last year. He began the PGA Tour restart at No. 11 but has played in just two events, the Memorial and the PGA, and now sits at No. 16.

Numerous contenders at the PGA Championship made big jumps

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There were obviously a number of players at the PGA Championship who had a chance to win, some of whom made some big jumps in the latest Official World Golf Ranking.

Runner-up Paul Casey, who carded his 10th career top-10 finish in a major, moved from No. 28 to No. 19. Following just his second career major championship appearance, 24-year-old Scottie Scheffler, who tied for fourth, jumped 13 spots from No. 59 to No. 46. Tony Finau got back into the top 15 and is now ranked No. 14 in the world while former world No. 1 Jason Day continues to rise back up the ranking and is now No. 32, jumping up 35 spots in the past five weeks.

21-year-old Matthew Wolff, who shot a brilliant 65 in the final round at Harding Park to get into a tie for fourth, is ranked the highest he’s ever been at No. 36. Cameron Champ also finds himself with the highest rank he’s ever had, moving from No. 77 to No. 68.

Expect quite a bit of shuffling in the Official World Golf Ranking over the next few weeks. The FedEx Cup Playoffs are right around the corner with the U.S. Open lurking right behind.