Antonio Brown Can Earn $750,000 During the Super Bowl, Even if He Doesn’t Play a Single Snap

When the Tampa Bay Buccaneers signed Antonio Brown during the 2020 season, it was a clear statement of intent. While you could argue that the receiver’s behavior didn’t warrant an NFL contract, he seemed to be the final piece of an impressive offensive puzzle. The Buccaneers, it seemed, were going all-in an effort to reach the Super Bowl.

Those efforts have since paid off, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers are one win away from lifting the Lombardi Trophy. Speaking of Antonio Brown, though, the receiver will have some extra motivation when the big game rolls around: an extra $750,000.

Antonio Brown had a relatively uneventful season with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers

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For better or worse, NFL wide receivers have somewhat of a reputation for being unique personalities. When it comes to Antonio Brown, however, being a little bit quirky is the least of his problems.

Brown made a name for himself with the Pittsburgh Steelers, establishing himself as one of the NFL’s most talented wideouts; he eventually wore out his welcome in the Steel City though, and, in 2019, joined the Oakland Raiders. At that point, though, things started to collapse.

During his time in Oakland, Brown made headlines for all the wrong reasons. He showed up to camp with frostbitten feet, threatened to retire because of his helmet, and eventually clashed with GM Mike Mayock. He was cut without playing a single game, joined the New England Patriots, and was cut again after being accused of sexual assault and rape.

While he seemed interested in doing everything besides football, Brown eventually joined the Tampa Bay Buccaneers after serving an eight-game suspension. He appeared in 10 games, including the playoffs, catching 48 passes for 542 yards and five touchdowns.

Antonio Brown might not play in the Super Bowl, but he can still earn an extra $75,000

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Due to a nagging knee issue, Antonio Brown is doubtful for the Super Bowl. Even if he isn’t on the field, though, the wide receiver could still earn a nice chunk of change if the Buccaneers take home the ‘W.’

According to Spotrac’s contract data, Brown signed a one-year deal with the Buccaneers worth $750,000 in base salary with a $250,000 roster bonus. There were also a handful of performance incentives, though. Brown received an additional $31,250 for each game he dressed for and earned $250,000 for catching over 45 passes; there were also two $250,000 incentives that he didn’t achieve for accumulating 650 receiving yards and catching six touchdowns.

Brown’s earnings haven’t capped out there, though. Since the receiver played more than 35% of Tampa’s offensive snaps, he’s eligible for a $750,000 bonus if the Buccaneers win the Super Bowl. That money isn’t contingent on him taking the field during the big game.

Can the Tampa Bay Buccaneers pull off a Super Bowl upset?

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If you ask the oddsmakers, the Kansas City Chiefs are favored to win the Super Bowl. As we’ve learned over the years, though, you can bet against Tom Brady at your own risk.

When the two teams met in the regular season, the Chiefs jumped out to an early lead as Tyreek Hill decimated the Buccaneers’ secondary; while Brady and his offense attempted to mount a comeback, they couldn’t close the gap before the final whistle. The Super Bowl will likely be based around a similar plotline. We know that Patrick Mahomes can make magic happen, and Tom Brady is elite when the game is on the line. Can the Tampa Bay defense keep the game within touching distance and give their quarterback a chance to do his thing?

It goes without saying that Antonio Brown will head into the big game hoping to become a Super Bowl champion. A $750,000 check, though, will make any potential celebrations a whole lot sweeter.

Stats courtesy of Pro-Football-Reference